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Oxtail

Although beef and ox were historically different, today, beef comes from male and female animals. Oxen are no longer found on farms, so any meat labeled “ox” is beef – “oxtail” has become the name for a beef tail. Cows have more fat than bulls, so their meat is juicier, moister, and more tender than meat from male cattle.

The meat is done when it simply falls off the bone, it really shouldn’t take any effort to take it off! Remove the bone and finish your stock by bringing it up to taste with some salt. You can eat it as such, or add more ingredients to make a hearty soup.

Baked oxtails can make for a delicious and flavorful meal if the cooking conditions are right. Baked oxtails benefit from a lower cooking temperature to avoid a tough texture. If you’re using an oven, it’s best to keep the cooking temperature between 275 degrees and 350 degrees. The lower your temperature, the longer you’ll want to bake your oxtails. If you’re baking your oxtails at 350 degrees, start with a cook time of one hour. After an hour, rotate the oxtails and allow them to bake for another hour.

However, before you season and cook oxtails, ensure that they are properly cleaned. Oxtails always have a kind of unique flavor, and no matter what delicacy it is used to prepare , the flavor always stands out. Oxtail is full of connective tissue and also very rich in collagen, so it always thickens soups, stews, and any meal it is cooked with.

This makes oxtail expensive because it requires more effort on the part of farmers to make a high-quality oxtail. One serving of oxtail also contains 233 milligrams of sodium and no carbohydrates whatsoever. In strike zone wiffle ball a 100-gram serving of oxtail, there are 30.93 grams of protein. This amount makes oxtail a very good source of protein, as this is almost two-thirds of the daily protein requirement for a 2,000-calorie diet.